Thursday Night Post

My treasure trove of old magazines has increased, so we’re jumping from our well-reviewed 1939 copy of LIFE Magazine to the 18 November, 1944 edition of the Saturday Evening Post.

Check out that heroic wartime cover!
Check out that heroic wartime cover! Local readers may find something of special interest if they click through to see the larger version.

Two insurance and finance-related ads struck me:

An ad for fire insurance, using the image of a member of the armed forces to evoke patriotic imagery
An ad for fire insurance, using the image of a member of the armed forces to evoke patriotic imagery, with some hard truths about the economic times ahead.

This ad attempts to convince people that they need fire insurance and that fire insurance is a necessary and desirable product; carrying insurance was far from standard at this point in American history. I note that the ad pushes several angles. The first is that banks will refuse to lend to people without insurance, suggesting that people should be borrowing money to start new enterprises (again, relatively rare at the time) and the second is that insurance companies make little to no profit (clearly intended to persuade suspicious consumers that insurance is run more like a public service than a business).

This ad is for insurance, of course, but 64 years later, many people had dream homes which were turning into nightmares.
This ad is for insurance, but 64 years later, many people had dream homes which were turning into nightmares for other reasons.

Any insurance agents in the house want to tell me how much the insurance policy discussed in this article would cost today? Something tells me a lot more than $10 (well, $120 in 2009 dollars). It’s also interesting to note that this article also plays upon wartime patriotic sentiments; buy insurance and smash the seventh column!

Click through for embiggenment!